April 30, 2021 · Uncategorized

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This Hammerjaw (Osmosudis lowii) have expandable stomachs and jaws that open to wide angles. The combination allows these predators to consume prey larger than they are, The abdomen of the Hammerjaw is stretched so tight that the squid can be clearly observed through its side.
The “Swallowers” (family Chiasmodontidae) can consume prey roughly the same size, or even larger, than they are. The common name for the group… these fishes have expandable stomachs. Trawled from between 1,200—1,000 meters depth, Gulf of Mexico, April 2021.
A “whipnose anglerfish” (Gigantactis microdontis) with a copepod parasite. I believe that this copepod is from the family Pennellidae .
The esca of a “whipnose anglerfish” (Gigantactis microdontis)
The Phantom Anglerfish (Haplophryne mollis) belongs to a group of anglerfish known as the “Ghostly Seadevils.” Part of the scientific name of this species (the genus) translates to “simple toad.” Prominent spines and the opaque, low-pigment tissue are diagnostic for the species.
Diplophos taenia and ventral photophores
Lancetfish, Alepisaurus ferox
Lancetfish, Alepisaurus ferox
Dragonfish, Astronesthes gemmifer, w black light bottom
Deep sea dragonfish (Eustomias hypopsilus) with a long barbel and bioluminescent bulbs. The fish creates the bioluminescence (intrinsic bioluminescence). The bulbs help bring potential prey items to within striking distance. A close-up of bulbs to the upper right.
The Atlantic Loosejaw (Aristostomias xenostoma) has a photophore at the base of its eye that produces red light. It can also see red light. Inasmuch, this fish can turn on the lights to hunt small prey items that cannot see the light.
This Lovely Hatchetfish (Argyropelecus aculeatus) was trawled from between 1,200-1,000m depth, Gulf of Mexico, April 2021.
This Lovely Hatchetfish (Argyropelecus aculeatus) was trawled from between 1,200-1,000m depth, Gulf of Mexico, April 2021.
A juvenile Deepbody Boarfish (Antigonia capros) trawled from between 200m depth and the surface.
The Louvar (Lavarus imperialis) has an oddly shaped larval stage with a rostrum that hints at what these fish look like as adults (Google it, strange fish). On this latest research cruise, we found two juveniles. The top individual had some damage on the way up, the bottom specimen is in mint condition. The species is mesopelagic and epipelagic – found in the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans in tropical and subtropical waters.
Leptocephalus – Ophichthinae
Cookie Cutter Shark (Isistius brasiliensis) on deck
Cookie Cutter Shark (Isistius brasiliensis)
Cookie Cutter Shark (Isistius brasiliensis)
Cookie Cutter Shark (Isistius brasiliensis)
Cookie Cutter Shark (Isistius brasiliensis)
Cookie Cutter Shark (Isistius brasiliensis)
Cookie Cutter Shark (Isistius brasiliensis)
Cookie Cutter Shark (Isistius brasiliensis) under black light
The “Banded Piglet Squid” or “”Pferrer’s Cranch Squid” (Helicocranchia pfefferi) is known for its characteristic behavior of arranging its tentacles and arms above its siphon, creating the appearance of a pig.
Pelagic Cephalopod, Japatella diaphana
Paralarval Bathothauma lyromma
An Alciopid worm (possibly Vanadis crystallina), trawled from the Gulf of Mexico between 200m depth and the surface-April 2021.
An Alciopid worm (possibly Vanadis crystallina), trawled from the Gulf of Mexico between 200m depth and the surface-April 2021.
Another splash of color in the nets… this time in an uncommonly encountered deep water shrimp (Physetocaris microphthalma).
Having way too much fun with the black light out here on the Gulf of Mexico… this is a crab megalops in natural light (bottom) and black light (top). Scale is in mm. All work part of DEEPEND-RESTORE aboard the RV Point Sur.
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