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Bioluminescence Photographs

© Danté Fenolio. These images are here for your enjoyment. The copyrights to all images on this site are held by the photographer. Do not replicate, copy, or use in any fashion the images from this web site without express written consent of the photographer.

The photographer would like to thank Terry Lynch for his advice and suggestions to improve his photographic skills with bioluminescent wildlife. Please visit Terry's site at: http://www.byteland.org/naturalist/firefly_faq.html.

Click on a picture to enlarge it.

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Firefly squid, Watasenia scintillans, migrate from deep waters toward the shallower waters of coastal Japan to breed each year. They are a bioluminescent species, having photophores on their ventral surfaces for counter-illumination. This squid was photographed in the Sea of Japan (2007). See more firefly squid images on the Japan images link.
Click beetles (of the family Elateridae) include species with bioluminescent photophores on their bodies. In South Florida, a species common in the Caribbean, Ignelater havaniensis, is not uncommon in neighborhood yards.
This moth grub glows in the dark after death. Click on the image to see a larger picture and read more details.
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This moth grub glows in the dark after death. Click on the image to see a larger picture and read more details.
This moth grub glows in the dark after death. Click on the image to see a larger picture and read more details.
This moth grub glows in the dark after death. Click on the image to see a larger picture and read more details.
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This moth grub glows in the dark after death.
This anglerfish, Melanocetus Johnsoni, is a voracious mesopelagic predator. This individual was collected between 1000 and 1500 meters depth in the Gulf of Mexico. Click on the image to see a larger picture and read more details.
Generated by Galerie
Saturday, 07 July 2007


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