November 19, 2009 · Uncategorized

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I have been working on photographing bioluminescence for the past few years. These images are results from a couple of recent shoots. Most of these shots are simple timed exposures ranging from 2 minutes to 15 minutes. I’d like to thank Terry Lynch, Mike Ready, and Bill Lamar for their suggestions and input as I began to learn bioluminescence photography.

Motyxia sequoia alia adult (orange phase) No3 LR

Motyxia sequoia alia - orange phase

Motyxia sequoia alia adult (yellow-white phase) No1 LR

Motyxia sequoia alia - newly molted

Motyxia sequoia alia bioluminescence No1 LR

Motyxia sequoia alia - bioluminescence

Motyxia sequoia alia bioluminescence No4 LR

Motyxia sequoia alia - bioluminescence

Motyxia sequoia alia bioluminescence No5 LR

Motyxia sequoia alia - bioluminescence

Fluorescence of Motyxia No1 LR

Motyxia sequoia alia - Fluorescence under black light

Fluorescence of Motyxia No2 LR

Motyxia sequoia alia - Fluorescence under black light

Georgia Firefly No1 LOWRES

Bioluminescence in a species of Photinus fire fly from Georgia

Georgia Firefly No4 LOWRES

Bioluminescence in a species of Photinus fire fly from Georgia

Georgia Firefly No6 LOWRES

Bioluminescence in a species of Photinus fire fly from Georgia

Georgia Firefly No7 LOWRES

Bioluminescence in a species of Photinus fire fly from Georgia

Written by Dante


12 comments on “Bioluminescence”

  1. Henry Robison:

    I didn’t even know there were bioluminescent millipedes. Great job! Also, I love the fireflies from my native state of Georgia.


  2. Dante:

    Henry,

    I’ve learned quite a bit about photographing bioluminescence in the past few years and am really enjoying the results of those lessons now. Thanks for the comments and I hope there will be a lot more to show in the near future.


  3. Jennie:

    These photographs are amazing! I was wondering if I could use them in my university project. I am making a small glowing diorama and these photos would work perfectly on it, and as reference pictures! Please e-mail me if you’re interested. Thank you.


  4. Andrew Olson:

    beautiful. i really want to learn how to captive produce Xystocheir and Motyxia. i’ve seen Xystocheir in real life… a field full of them under a powerful black light is stunning… i can’t even imagine what a fully bioluminescent millipede would be like

    it’s gooood to live in CA! (though, southern CA is preeeety darn far away from all those species)


  5. Dante:

    Hi Andrew,

    I agree, culturing Motyxia would be great. There would be a lot of educational avenues opened up with captive produced Motyxia available. How great for kids to see glowing millipedes in the classroom and study them in life.

    Cheers!


  6. Dr. H. Sampson:

    Dante,

    You should get these to more people. They are fantastic!

    Have you seen Flickr’s bioluminescence group?

    http://www.flickr.com/groups/746474@N25/

    Hal


  7. sunam banerjee:

    beautifull millipedes with bioluminiscency thanks a lot==========as per my wish if you show me a lantern fish


  8. Dante:

    Thanks Sunam-I have Lanternfish shots in the Gulf of Mexico blog. Capturing their bioluminescence will be a challenge…but I’ll give it a shot.

    Cheers


  9. Natalia Vlaticovski:

    This must be great photography and hard accomplishment. I like^


  10. Dante:

    Hi Natalia-the interesting part with bioluminescence is figuring out shutter speed. I’ve enjoyed learning how to shoot things that glow in the dark and I appreciate your comment!
    Cheers & Thanks-Dante


  11. Letitia:

    It’s about time soenome wrote about this.


  12. Dante:

    Hi Letitia-thank you! All living things that glow in the dark are of interest to me.


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