May 25, 2014 · Uncategorized

As with all of my images posted here, they are for your enjoyment and are not public domain, all are copyrighted. Please do not copy, download, post online, or reuse in any fashion the photographs that I have posted without express written permission to do so. Any use of my images must be approved in writing. To access the images I have posted, you must click on the subject heading link above. By doing so, your action serves as legal recognition of my stated copyright restrictions; it signifies your willingness to use the images only after written permission is provided, and it acknowledges that failure to follow the rules is a violation of international copyright law. Thank you for your cooperation.Got to work in the Ozarks again with some of my good friends and colleagues. Matt Niemiller and Daphne Soares drove out from the east and Mike Slay made it over for a short time. Great company. It was a little cold and the trip wound up being cut short because a blizzard was on its way in. The road to the cabin where we stay is exposed and getting out in heavy snow or ice would have been tough. But we still got a few good days of caving in.Got to hit more Ozark caves again in May. The standard crew was there (Matt Niemiller and Daphne Soares).

Surveyed for the new blind cave snail again and found a second site for it!

Surveyed for the new blind cave snail again and found a second site for it!

Had not seen the Christian School Cave Isopod (Caecidotea macropopoda) in a while.  Nice find.

Had not seen the Christian School Cave Isopod (Caecidotea macropopoda) in a while. Nice find.

Matt and I regularly survey one population of Grotto Salamanders (Eurycea spelaea) and have been for years.  Always nice to see an adult in-situ.

Matt and I regularly survey one population of Grotto Salamanders (Eurycea spelaea) and have been for years. Always nice to see an adult in-situ.

Close up of the adult Grotto Salamander

Close up of the adult Grotto Salamander

Groundwater flatworm from another bioinventory.

Groundwater flatworm from another bioinventory.

Lots of aquatic leeches in one of the cave streams

Lots of aquatic leeches in one of the cave streams

Stygobitic amphipod, Delaware Co., OK

Stygobitic amphipod, Delaware Co., OK

One of the systems started out as a tight crawl...

One of the systems started out as a tight crawl...

Then it narrowed down from there.

Then it narrowed down from there.

But we all had a great time

But we all had a great time

I don't get to see old friends every day.  I met Keith "Andy" Harris around 1999 in Oklahoma City.  He has been a great caving companion and an even better friend since.  Great seeing him.

I don't get to see old friends every day. I met Keith "Andy" Harris around 1999 in Oklahoma City. He has been a great caving companion and an even better friend since. Great seeing him.

More later

Written by Dante


2 comments on “More Ozark caving, May 2014”

  1. Tom:

    Dante:

    Only a couple of comments / questions both related to my hypothesis that reducing troglomorphies (eyes and pigment) are universal but elaborating troglomorphies (relative sense organ length, body shape, life history, metabolic economies) are often nit found in organism with simple body plants and low costs of doing business (e.g. flatworms and snails). Your Physid – looking snail looks standard re shape and tentacles but the shell is very translucent. It would be neat to assay the relative shell thickness in troglobites and troglophiles. Ditto re the flatworm that looks standard in shape.


  2. Dante:

    Tom-we are looking at the shell of this new cave snail. Daphne Soares just finished making a MICROct scan of the shell. Will let you know what we find!


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